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COVID-19 – Its Stressors And Coping

September 14,2021 By: Mansi poddar

The COVID-19 pandemic is causing a major effect on our lives. Many of us are facing challenges that can be stressful, overwhelming, and cause strong emotions in adults and children. Learning to cope with stress healthily will make you, the people you care about, and those around you become more resilient.

With the ongoing situation, it’s important to take care not only of our physical health but our mental health as well. It’s not easy, to watch the news every day stating, ” Highest record of covid-19 cases recorded in a single day “, watching people not being able to retain basic hospital amenities, feeling anxious and helpless. Among all this, it’s vital to keep a healthy and positive environment around you. As your energy is contagious, the way you feel, you make others feel.

COVID stressors and their coping skills –

1. Fake Information

Lack of adequate information can lead to feelings of fear and anxiety hence one should always get reliable and true information. Do not instantly believe in WhatsApp forwards as a lot of time they are fake and create panic.

Coping: Follow authentic government portals for true information. Don’t keep on checking the news channels again and again.

2. Uncertainty About Future

Creates anxiety and panic among many people. With thoughts like ” What will happen now”, ” What will I do”

Coping: Make a plan, engage in activities that enhance your skill sets and which will help you in your future endeavours.

3. Boredom

Lack of routine, restriction in movement, lack of activities to do, isolation and loneliness makes a person feel low.

Coping: Engage in your hobbies be it cooking or reading that will help you focus on something more than the pandemic. Create a basic schedule for yourself as routine brings predictability in times of uncertainty.

4. Mental And Physical Health

These times can impact your overall health in general. It causes anxiety and stress and makes a person feel low on energy. Depression and panic attacks are also experienced by some.

Coping: it’s important to express your emotions and concerns, join support groups or take professional help if needed.

Exercise daily, eat well and sleep well. Build your immune system. Engage in family activities like playing board games, watching a movie together, learning a new activity, etc.

5. Reduced Social Activity

Staying away from your loved ones, reduced interpersonal and emotional support can cause anxiety and stress and make a person feel lonely. Many families may witness irritating and shouting behaviour, emotional outbursts, changes in sleeping and eating patterns, lack of common time, etc.

Coping: Be in touch with your friends and family over video calls, plan a movie night, be engaged in activities, take out a common time to spend with your family and indulge in activities you can do together be it meditation, yoga or playing games.

Remember you are not alone. Pause. Breathe, and reflect. As Kate Morton said, “You make a life out of what you have, not what you’re missing.”